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When Should You Get Tested For Diabetes - Follow The Evidence

Diabetes affects more than 34 million US adults, and it is estimated that over 7 million of these adults are undiagnosed. The prevalence of this condition increases with age and thus why we call it a progressive condition.


What is type 2 diabetes?


Insulin, a hormone made by the pancreas, helps regulate sugar levels after a meal is ingested. In type 2 diabetes, your body does not use it's insulin appropriately, or there is a lack of secretion to help maintain balanced sugar levelsues affecting both small and large blood vessel


Long term diabetes places people at risk for developing heart disease and stroke. Diabetic patients are at risk for developing kidney damage called diabetic nephropathy, which can progress to kidney failure due to damaged filtering units within the kidney.


Poorly controlled diabetes can lead to visual damage (retinopathy) and loss of sensation to the skin (neuropathy). This can lead to further complications related to diabetes.





What causes diabetes?


Diabetes affects more than 34 million US adults, and it is estimated that over 7 million of these adults are undiagnosed. The prevalence of this condition increases with age and thus why we call it a progressive condition.


Certain factors play a roll in the cause of diabetes. There seems to be a genetic link associated with diabetic patients, but majority of cases are due to the way we live our lives.


Obesity due to over-nutrition or poor lifestyle increases the risk for developing insulin resistance. Inflammatory conditions triggered by obesity seem to play a role.


Who to screen for diabetes?


Based on the United States Preventative Task Force there is fair amount of evidence to screen for type 2 diabetes in asymptomatic adults with sustained blood pressure (either treated or untreated) greater than 135/80 mm/hg. Screening for diabetes should commence at age 40 for overweight and obese patients.


The American Academy of Family Physicians recommends screening for type 2 diabetes in adults with high blood pressure and elevated cholesterol levels


The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends fasting glucose testing for women beginning at age 45, with an interval of 3 years.


The American Diabetes Association recommends screening asymptomatic adults every 3 years starting at age 45 years of age. It is also recommended to screen adults at any age with a BMI >25 with increased risk factors. Those with pre-diabetes (blood sugars ranging between 100-125) should be screened annually.


The American Diabetes Association also recommends screening children/adolescents if they are overweight or obese and have 1 or more pediatric risk factors.


Risk Factors


Adults Risk Factors:

  1. 1st degree relative with diabetes or high risk ethnicity

  2. Women who are diagnosed with gestational diabetes

  3. History of cardiovascular disease or abnormal cholesterol levels

  4. Women with PCOS

  5. Physical inactivity with other clinical conditions associated with type 2 diabetes

  6. Low dietary flavonoid intake

  7. Antipsychotic medication usage

  8. Cholesterol medication usage

Children Risk Factors:

  1. Maternal Diabetes or gestational diabetes during child's gestation

  2. Type 2 diabetes in 1st or 2nd degree family member

  3. High risk ethnicity

  4. Clinical conditions associated with type 2 diabetes

How to prevent diabetes


Listen to this podcast for more information regarding insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.



Lifestyle modifications along with changes in eating pattern are effective in preventing or delaying type 2 diabetes.


Schedule an appointment with us at Florida Advanced Medicine to help optimize your health and screen for preventative conditions. We serve Orlando, Florida but can offer telemedicine services upon request.







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